“Are You A Meddler?”

One thing people can’t say about Chiropractors is that we aren’t a passionate bunch.

We know what we know and believe what we believe and we want to share it with the world.

But, how far is too far and what’s our real reason for doing so and is it really worth the hassle?

I used to be a meddler but what I found is that it created the opposite desired effect.

Through the years, I’ve learned that free advice is never valued, acted upon, or appreciated.

Plus, it is a great way of devaluating yourself.

I’m sure you have friends and family who don’t truly value who you are and what you know.

They may even think you’re a big joke.

How can you know anything? They think they know you inside and out. They’ve known you since you were a snot nosed kid or as a once bouncer at a bar, or from when you were an electrician. (But they don’t REALLY know you at all.)

Aside for a small handful of people (only 1 or 2 being a blood relative), no one really knows the real me, my intense desire to truly help people and how hard I truly work at who I am and what I do.

The moment I let them in is the exact moment they interpret me as a meddler and start feeling envious, jealous, defensive, or less successful or confident.

No one likes those feelings.

Most people like problems, not solutions. It gives them something to think about without doing much of anything at all.

Unless I have a bigger strategy and plan in mind that benefits both parties, I only offer my advice to people who…

A. Ask me for it

and…

B. Pay me for it.

YOU MUST BE OKAY WITH THAT AND NOT NEED ANYONE’S APPROVAL TO CREATE VALUE IN THE WORLD AND A BETTER LIFE FOR YOURSELF AND THOSE WHO DO VALUE, APPRECIATE, RESPECT, AND PAY YOU!

Even when people/patients pay you, make sure you focus only on what concerns them.

The moment you probe or go beyond what they came to you for, even if you know it can change their health and life immensely, eventually they will make you “wrong” in their minds. You will get defensive and you will lose them.

 

Watching your back,

Ben Altadonna